Phosgene
COCl2
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General Characteristics Health Hazards Material Recommendations
A colorless, nonflammable and liquefied gas with an odor similar to most hay. A simple asphyxiant. Dry Gas: Stainless steel, copper and brass - Moist Gas: Monel
TLV-TWA Flammable Limits DOT Class / Label
0.1 ppm Nonflammable 2.3 / Poison Gas
Molecular Weight Specific Gravity Specific Volume
98.9 3.48 @ 77° F 3.8 cu.ft./lb @ 70° F
CGA Valve Outlet CAS Registry No. UN Number
660 75-44-5 1076
National Stock Number (NSN) Applicable to Phosgene MIL Specs/ Fed Specs
MSDS for Phosgene


Grade
Part #
Purity Minimum Cylinder
Size
Volume
LBS
Pressure
@ 70 F
Comments
Chemically Pure
471800
99% Min.
Liquid Phase
044
007
003
002
95
10
5
1
10.7
10.7
10.7
10.7

None


Uses: Phosgene - COCl2 is used in organic synthesis, in manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, herbicides, insecticides, synthetic foams, resins, and polymers. Phosgene is a lung irritant and extremely toxic. It is also produced in the presence of refrigerants that are drawn through a heat source, refrigeration technicians should take extreme caution and prevent the exposure by making sure that smoking is avoided in the presence of refrigerants and preventing inhalation of the gas when soldering or brazing.

Also called CARBONYL CHLORIDE, a colourless, chemically reactive, highly toxic gas having an odour like that of musty hay, used in making organic chemicals, dyestuffs, polycarbonate
resins, and isocyanates for making polyurethane resins. It first came into prominence during World War I, when it was used, either alone or mixed with chlorine, against troops. Inhalation
causes severe lung injury, the full effects appearing several hours after exposure.

First prepared in 1811, phosgene is manufactured by the reaction of carbon monoxide and chlorine in the presence of a catalyst. It can be formed by the thermal decomposition of
chlorinated hydrocarbons; e.g., when carbon tetrachloride (q.v.) is used as a fire extinguisher. Gaseous phosgene, which has a density about three and one-half times that of air, liquefies at a
temperature of 8.2° C (46.8° F); it is usually stored and transported as the liquid under pressure in steel cylinders or as a solution in toluene. With water, phosgene reacts to form carbon dioxide and hydrochloric acid.


Last Updated: 98 AUG 10