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General Characteristics Health Hazards Material Recommendations
A colorless, nonflammable, liquefied and odorless gas A Simple Asphyxiant Normal materials can be used.
TLV-TWA Flammable Limits DOT Class / Label
1000 ppm Nonflammable 2.2 / Nonflammable
Molecular Weight Specific Gravity Specific Volume
146.1 5.11 @ 68 F 2.5 cu.ft./lb @ 70 F
CGA Valve Outlet CAS Registry No. UN Number
590 2251-62-4 1080
National Stock Number (NSN) Applicable to Sulfur Hexafluoride MIL Specs/ Fed Specs
MSDS for Sulfur Hexafluoride


Grade
Part #
Purity Minimum Cylinder
Size
Volume
LBS
Pressure
@ 70 F
Comments
Instrument
472500
99.99% Min. Liquid Phase 044
016
007
115
38
10
320
320
320
Chemically Pure
404700
99.8% Min. Liquid Phase 044
016
012
007
LBS
115
38
25
10

0.5
320
320
320
320
320

None

Supercritical fluid
474700
SFC A31 78 320

None


Uses: Sulfur hexafluoride is used as a gaseous insulator in power breakers. Used as a trace gas and an oxygen asyphxiant in aluminum foundry application in reduction of porosity, replacing corrosive and toxic chlorine processes. A unique specialty gas product for which no other gas has been found suitable for replacement.

Sulfur forms a wide variety of compounds with halogen elements. In combination with chlorine it yields sulfur chlorides such as disulfur dichloride, S2Cl2, a corrosive, golden-yellow liquid used in the manufacture of chemical products. It reacts with ethylene to produce mustard gas, and with unsaturated acids derived from fats it forms oily products that are basic components of lubricants. With fluorine, sulfur forms sulfur fluorides, the most useful of which is sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, a gas employed as an insulator in various electrical devices. Sulfur also forms oxyhalides, in which the sulfur atom is bonded to both oxygen and halogen atoms.